Impossible: Review

Fresh from its hit run in London’s West End, Impossible reinvents the biggest illusions in history and audiences should prepare to be mesmerized and baffled by the performers’ stunning range of magical artistry.

By Manchester's Finest | March 29th '16

Fresh from its hit run in London’s West End, Impossible reinvents the biggest illusions in history and audiences should prepare to be mesmerized and baffled by the performers’ stunning range of magical artistry. From nail-biting escapology to amazing mind-reading; jaw-dropping sleight of hand to grand illusions, Impossible showcases some of the world’s greatest magical talent.

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Impossible, the most dangerous show the UK has ever seen arrives at theatres across the country this spring.

Featuring six performers with magical talents ranging from mind bending mind-reader to hip hop street magician – the team of Impossible are out to prove that magic and grand illusion are still relevant.

Steeped in drama with an impressive set and a voice over narration comparable to something from a semi-spooky theme park ride, the night begins well.

Lloyd Wood (Director): ‘The Impossible team are embarking on an extraordinarily exciting journey bringing together masters of their craft from the UK and abroad to demonstrate their exceptional skill, dexterity and fearlessness presenting original and inventive stage magic.

Exploring the feats of the impossible with grand illusion, sleight of hand, daredevil escapology and mind-blowing mentalism we aim to inspire and thrill our audiences from all around the UK whilst taking them on a journey through the light and dark of magic, mysticism and mystery across the ages.’

Many of the acts required audience participation which sent wild giggles of excitement through the auditorium to begin with before the fear set in when it dawned on the participants that they might be chopped in half or set on fire.

Not to fear – the only person being chopped up was the only female performer of the piece – the team of Impossible obviously decided to ignore the evolution of the role of the woman on stage when embarking on their magical reinvention.

Stand out performer of the night was Magical Bones – the hip hop street magician, (sounds bizarre on paper I know). Considered to be the most exciting talent to have emerged from the magic industry in recent years, (real name Richard) brought something genuine, Dynamo-esque to his performance, making his magic seem tangible and less Liberace than the rest.

A comedienne said recently that less people watch live comedy and prefer to watch it from the comfort of their couch – and I think the same can be said for magic.

Impossible feels like the next phase of performance evolution from greats such as Houdini with their brilliant ideas and the impressive production.

Definitely a night for all ages – maybe more so for a younger crowd

Remember, whatever you do, don’t try this at home- the female of the household might not like the sparkly leotard provided.